Passwords may be a necessary evil...

I have banged on for quite a while now that reusing passwords is a bad idea, using dictionary words for passwords is a bad idea, using personally identifiable information as a password is a bad idea...you get the picture. I hear the refrain from users regularly "but remembering passwords, especially good ones, is hard!" and I agree with you! Here's my secret though; I don't remember my passwords at all. My Facebook password? No idea. Twitter account? Pfft, wouldn't have a clue. Flickr account? Couldn't tell you. They are all randomly generated strings of letters, numbers, and symbols exceeding 20 characters. Who the heck can remember that?! Better still, how the heck do you crack or guess it either?! And that is the entire point :)

Using a password strength checker like "How Secure Is My Password" reveals my Facebook password would take "a desktop PC about 14 duodecillion years to crack your password"...however long that that is, but pretty sure it exceeds the heat death of the universe!

So how do I do it? I make the computer do the work for me. In my case, I use a program called "1Password" which is great for me. The idea is, you remember a single, good password to unlock all the other passwords. So whilst I don't know what most of my passwords are, I remember the one password that my computer uses to securely store my passwords. This is a great concept and provided that one "master" password is secure (mine is an entire sentence with extra "bits") your passwords are safe.

The down side is, 1Password isn't free and buying it can be a stumbling block for some users. However, I've come across a great tool called Dashlane Password Manager. Not only is it FREE but it has nearly complete feature parity with 1Password! The more advanced features, like cloud backups etc, are a paid option but for home users, this shouldn't be a huge problem.

So now there's no excuse to be using those crappy passwords on every site you visit! GO GET Dashlane Password Manager!!

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